Ein englischer Reisender in Eisenstadt (1840)

 

Am 3. Oktober 1840 begann Charles Vane, 3rd Marquess of Londonderry (1778-1854),  – der sich damals auf einer Reise nach Konstantinopel befand – auf Einladung des Fürsten mit der Besichtigung der verschiedenen Esterházyschen Residenzen.  Über seinen ersten Eindruck des Schlosses in Eisenstadt schrieb Vane:

Here  we were absolutely lost in admiration of the regal splendors of this family palace of the house of Esterhazy. Upwards of two hundred chambers for guests – one large saloon capable of dining of one thousand persons – may give some idea of the scale of the abode. It was chiefly erected by Prince Paul’s father. A battaliaon of the household guards mount at the principal entrances, all paid, armed, and equipped with the uniform of the family, from the revenues of the estate.1

Über die Architektur schrieb er:

The style of the mansion is Greek, and this has been preserved in the temples and ornamental erections in the grounds. One of the principal of these is the temple of Leopoldine, in which is placed a beautiful statue, by Canova, of the Princess Leopoldine Lichtenstein, the sister of the present proprietor.2

Besonderen Eindruck dürften die Gewächshäuser – und vor allem die Orangerie – gemacht haben:

A remarkable appendage to this enchanting possession are its conservatory and greenhouses. Their extent, breadth, and magnitude, are of fairy dimensions; three or four hundred orange trees alone shed their flowers and exhibit their hanging fruit in the centre of the ranges of glass.3

Selbst in England, so Vane, wäre eine so umfassende – ohne Rücksicht auf Schwierigkeiten oder Kosten zusammengetragene – Sammlung von Pflanzen aus aller Welt nicht zu finden:

There is no collection comparable to this in England, not even at Sion House; and possibly, it is from witnessing the grandeur of this exhibition, that the Duke of Devonshire, with that patriotic taste and energy which is peculiar to him, has been induced to occupy himself in endeavouring to establish a rival wonder at Chatsworth, which has long obtained the palm of nulli secundus.4

 

  1. C. W. Vane, Marquess of Londonderry: A Steam Voyage to Constantinople, by the Rhine and the Danube, in 1840-41, and to Portugal, Spain, &c., in 1839. […] Bd. 1 (London 1842) 79-85; Zitate ebd., 83 f.. – Digitalisat: ANNO.. []
  2. Ebd., 84. []
  3. Ebd. []
  4. Ebd., 84 f. – Zu Sion House vgl. „Sion House“. In: The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No. 389 (September 12, 1829) 161-163, zu den Gärten ebd., 163. [Digitalisat: Google Books] –  Zur Geschichte der Gärten von Chatsworth vgl. https://www.chatsworth.org/garden/history-of-the-garden/. []

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.